Sunday, March 18, 2007

Sulphur Springs

Apparently, there were two sulphur springs in Kaukauna – one on the north side somewhere near the quarry and one on the south side near today’s swimming pool on the Konkapot (Kappel’s or Cobble’s Creek). Can anyone exactly locate these springs? Are they still active?

I’ve been told that people would come to the springs with empty bottles to collect the water to drink it for its beneficial qualities.

CAL

9 comments:

TD said...

1/23/1844
One of the greatest sulphur springs in the United States has been discovered on the estate of Charles and Alex Grignon at Kaukauna within a few rods (about 75 feet) of the Fox River. The medicinal properties of this spring, the convenience of it's location and the natural grandeur of the landscape scenery around it need only to be publicly known to render Kaukauna a place of fashionable resort during the summer months.
There is no doubt but the US Government will XXX long connect the waters of the Mississippi with lake Michigan by uniting the Neenah (Fox River) with the Wisconsin river and rendering both navigable for steamboat. Then will Kaukauna become the Saratoga of Wisconsin.

Transcribed from the Southport Telegraph 1/23/1844

Anonymous said...

The only sulphur spring I'm familiar with is located on the south side of Kaukauna. It was beside the path on the bottom of Cutler's Hill. I don't know if it's still there, but in the 1940's and 1950's the spring had a concrete cap on it. A pipe spout came out the side, and water ran constantly. It was a popular watering place for kids. Over time, the concrete cap was pushed aside and the spring was in danger of becoming contaminated. I don't know about it's condition today.

Interesting thing - I knew folks who had sulphur water as their home tap water, and got rid of it.
UB

kc said...

There was, and may still be, a sulphur spring on the north side which was similarly capped with the constantly flowing pipe spout. It was (is) located basically at the bottom of Plank Road, where it meets Augustine St., and flowed into the channel below the fifth lock.

Anonymous said...

There was/is a sulphur spring near the 5th lock on Augustine Street on the north side of Kaukauna. I remember as a kid scooping a couple hands full of icy cold water on a hot day.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous' March 19 comment is correct. I lived on the south side on Dixon street and we used to play in Cutler's woods located off the east end of 7th street near Metoxen. Seventh street ended but there was part of an old gravel roadway that went down the hill into the woods. Sulphur springs was at the bottom of the hill and a little to the south of the faux road. We used to pick buttercup flowers there because they grew so plentiful. The sulphur water saturated the ground nearby and we were careful not to step in the smelly stuff.

Anonymous said...

The sulpher spring at the bottom of Plank Road is still there although it is capped. I remember watching people fill their jugs when I was a kid. I saw an old timer kneel on a flat rock , lean down and take a drink directly from the water flowing from the pipe. He commented how nice and cold it was on that hot summer day so of course I had to try it too. I don't know how much longer he lived, but it couldn't have been too bad because I'm still here 50 some years later.

Anonymous said...

There is a sulfur spring at the bottom of plank road. My grandfather is actually the one who owns the property it's on. He fills up water bottles out of it all the time and claims it is the best water he has ever drank. He also has had it tested and the results came back that the water is very good to drink.

Anonymous said...

Does anyone know when the old north side depot was torn down and replaced by the new one? SR

Richard said...

The comments on the spring near the junction of Augustine and Plank are correct. That spring once flowed freely and was often visited by folks wanted "mineral water." The spring is still there, but capped. Historically, this spring was well known to fur traders and is mentioned in various early documents as a notable land-mark of sorts. The Grignons maintained a warehouse on the river bank just below the 5th lock, not far from the spring, so this area was often a stop-off for people traveling the river.